Tag: moving tips

Common Moving Mistakes that Can Put You at Risk for Identify Theft

A good friend of mine recently moved into Manhattan and unfortunately, misplaced some important documents in the shuffle. She is currently dealing with a very frustrating identity theft issue and so I thought today would be the perfect day to re-share this post from Paige.

 

Anyone who knows me knows that I have an uncanny fear of identity theft. I tend to hoard mail and old financial information for years, because I don’t want it to get into the wrong hands. The last time I moved, I had dressers filled with all sorts of papers to throw out. In my frenetic state, I wanted to throw it all into one big bag and out the door. But this would have been a huge mistake that could have caused me to lose my most valuable asset –my identity.

 

When people are in the midst of moving, they are usually so overwhelmed that they forget to protect themselves from identity theft – even though they know, and normally practice, proper ways to protect themselves. Here are IdentityTheftsome common mistakes people make when they are moving:

Throwing away documents with sensitive data. Always be sure to shred any and all documents displaying information about yourself, your family, your financials and anything else that is directly related to your personal identity.

Forgetting to change address with the post office. It’s easy to put off your change of address, but there are consequences for delaying this chore. Should any important information be sent via mail to your old address, anyone can take it and use it to their advantage. Even if you were close to your old neighbors, or sold your house to the nicest people, you don’t ever really know people. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Forgetting to notify banks, insurance companies, utilities providers, etc. of the move and new address. Remember the last time you went to the DMV? You probably had to show a proof of address, which is most often a bill from a bank or utility. Bills, bank statements and insurance documents contain a ton of information that anyone can use to steal your identity. Be sure to notify any financial or utility companies that you are moving in advance of your move so that you can either settle up, or have the address changed so that the bill comes to you. If you won’t be settled into your new home for a while, you can set up a P.O. Box or have your mail forwarded to a trustworthy family member or friend.

Keeping important documents, including titles, registration and insurance, in the car when it’s being moved. Again, you don’t want this important information in the wrong hands. Always keep important documents, from wills and birth certificates to car titles and registrations, on your person when you are moving.

Not vetting the moving company to make sure it is legitimate. Since your mover’s will be in you rhome and handling your items, you want to be sure you are working with a reputable company. A good moving company will only hire employees that have been background checked and drug tested. Here is an article on how to find a reputable moving company.

Leaving sensitive documents and materials, or computers open, in the presence of movers, contractors, utility representatives, cable representatives, etc. Your old home and your new home will be open to a variety of different people. Be sure to keep important documents under lock and key, and your computer locked, in the midst of all of the activity. In fact, be sure to password protect any mobile devices, including your smartphones and tablets, for additional piece of mind.

The FTC estimates that more than nine million people were victims of identity theft in the past year. It’s a staggering number that continues to grow. While most people know to be diligent online, it’s easy to forget that your identity can be compromised the old fashioned way – by theft of paper documents. It’s important to be diligent. If you have reason to believe that your information is in the wrong hands, or that you have been a victim of identity theft, here is helpful information from the FTC on the steps you will need to take to protect yourself.

Do you have any other tips for protecting your identity? Please share below.

Three Services That Are Worth the Expense During a Move

 

 

I’m a bargain queen and you can typically find me offering friends and family advice on how and where to get the best deal for everything. However, I am also a big fan of comfort and convenience and there are just some things worth3 services worth the expense during a move spending for. And honestly, in my opinion, moving is one of them. No matter how organized and prepared you are for an upcoming move, it is a ton of work. The cleaning, the packing, the physical move, the unpacking, it all takes a ton of time and a ton of effort. After my last move (for a while since my fiancé and I are finally homeowners!), I came up with this list of three things that I believe are always worth paying for when it comes to moving.

3 Tips to Stay Sane While Settling In

 

 

Stay sane while settling inAnd in the blink of an eye, summer is ending. Summer’s end means a lot of things, but in the household moving industry, it means a sigh of relief. The busiest time of year has yet again come to a close and while moving companies may be catching their breath, those of you who just moved may be feeling the opposite as it can be overwhelming to settle in to a new home after a move. Homes in transition have a tendency to drive people a little bit crazy but it’s really important to take care of yourself and your family so that your new house can truly start to feel like home. So, how can you keep calm and settle on after a move?

Have You Seen Our Moving Checklist and Planner?

 

How prepared are you for your upcoming move? I ask these questions because people grossly underestimate the amount of preparation that’s needed in order to have a stress free move. I know that preparation and stress free checklistdon’t necessarily go hand in hand for some folks, but when you are moving an entire house planning ahead will save you a ton of angst on moving day.

3 Benefits to Hiring a Professional Mover

 

benefits of working with a moverThe more stories I hear about friends and family moving themselves, the more benefits I think about regarding working with a professional. Don’t get me wrong, there are pros and cons to both sides. But when it comes to stress level, convenience, and safety, there’s no question about it; a professional is the way to go.

Home Finding Tip: Don’t Skip Exterior Inspections

 

 

With the busy moving season upon us, many of you will be searching for your new home, if you haven’t already found it. House hunting is both fun and stressful and while I definitely want you to enjoy your experience, I don’t want you Don't Skip Exterior Inspectionsto fall into any traps. As I continue my own search for a new home, I have found that it’s easy to get tunnel vision when you find something you love. Luckily, I have learned a lot in this industry and I have a wonderful Realtor on my side so I’ve caught myself before making any major mistakes. We’re told not to judge a book by its cover, and the same goes for homes and their curb appeal … to some extent. While some exterior issues can be easily fixed, others lead to a whole slew of problems that you don’t want to deal with.  

Foreclosure vs. Short Sale

 

 

Buying a home is no easy task. It takes a lot of work to find a home that suits your needs and preferences let alone foreclosure versus short saleyour budget. Going with a foreclosure or short sale property can be a great way to save money on a wonderful home, but it’s important to know the difference between the
two aswell as the challenges you may be faced with.

 
The difference:

 
A property is in foreclosure when the owner fails to make mortgage payments over a period of time and the lender takes ownership of the home. A home in foreclosure may be sold at an auction or sold by a Realtor. When dealing with a foreclosure, the bank is the seller, not the homeowner.

 

Don’t let the term “short-sale” throw you, the process can be much longer than a typical home sale. A short sale property is still owned by the homeowner, the borrower. Typically, the homeowner will make arrangements with the bank, the lender, to accept a price that is less than what is still owed on the property. In a short sale, the lender usually agrees to forgive the rest of the loan. The key here is to remember that the buyer, the seller, and all of the lenders involved need to agree on the sale price before a sale is finalized. Keep in mind that if there are multiple mortgages out, then all lenders are lien holders.

 

Things to consider:

 

Before making any decisions, learn the ins and outs of each process. You can find a ton of information online about foreclosures and short sales. It’s also a good idea to ask questions. Talk to Realtors, talk to friends who have gone through one or the other, seek out seminars, etc.

 

Do not attempt to handle this on your own. Invest in the help from a professional. Laws regarding these types of things vary from state to state so an experienced agent with established relationships with lenders will be a tremendous help.

 

Next, be very aware of what you may be dealing with in the future. For example, homes in foreclosure sold at an auction are often sold “as is” meaning that you may not even get the chance to enter the home before you are the new legal owner. There are no inspections or walk throughs and potential liens on the title.

 

Be patient. While purchasing a foreclosure or short sale property can save you money, the process is usually longer and more complicated than it would be otherwise. You’ll need to deal with waiting periods for a foreclosure and waiting for an agreement on price from all parties involved with a short sale.

 

Lastly, don’t forget the additional expenses you may encounter. While the base price will seem like a steal, you’ll have to remove any liens, pay any unpaid taxes, and of course pay for repairs that could have been covered by the previous owner if you were offered the chance of an inspection. By the time all of those costs are added, the deal may not seem as sweet.

 

Do not get me wrong, I am not saying that purchasing a foreclosure or short sale property is a mistake in any way. I just want you to be aware of all of the aspects and possible obstacles involved. Buying a home is a long term investment. It’s important to know exactly what you are doing and what is expected of you before you go through with anything.

9 Things to Consider Before Moving Yourself

 

 

Do-it-yourself moving is a great option for people who have the time, the support and the strength to see it through. DIY MovingThat said, there is a misconception that all it takes is a rental truck and a buddy. There is a lot more that goes into moving, so if you are considering a DIY option, make sure you understand what you are getting into. In all of my years in the moving business, I’ve heard horror stories of DIY moving gone wrong and, most of the time, they occur because people were not honest with themselves about risk, as well as their own capability to do the job.

Four Tips to Save for a Down Payment

 

 

Lately, it seems like all of my friends are either getting married, having children, or buying homes. A lot of my friends Tips to Save for a Down Payment on a New Homedown here in Florida work in Real Estate, and according to them, Millennials, at least in the Tampa Bay area, are leaning towards buying a home rather than renting one. With affordable mortgage rates, tons of inventory, and rent rates continuing to creep up, home buying here really is the best option. That is, of course, if you have enough for a down payment.

Your Moving Estimate vs. Your Actual Move Cost

 

 

Though some fluctuation is possible, a qualified mover should come pretty close in terms of the initial estimate and About Moving Estimatesthe final moving cost. However, a lot of people moving, especially for the first time may come across a frustrating and confusing question.

 

 

“Why was my estimate so much different than the actual cost of my move?!”